Latest News

  • PSA2018: Call for Papers

    Twenty-Sixth Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association November 1 – November 4, 2018 Seattle, WA Submission is now open for papers to be presented at the PSA2018 meeting in Seattle, WA, on November 1-4, 2018. This will be the 50th anniversary of the first biennial meeting of the PSA. The deadline for submitting a paper is March 1, 2...
  • PSA2018: Call for Symposium Proposals

    Twenty-Sixth Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association November 1 – November 4, 2018 Seattle, WA Submission is now open for proposals for symposia to be presented at the PSA2018 meeting in Seattle, WA, on November 1-4, 2018. This will be the 50th anniversary of the first biennial meeting of the PSA. The deadline for submitting sympo...
  • Michela Massimi Awarded the Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal

    Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal and Lecture The 2017 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal is awarded to Professor Michela Massimi, PSA member and former Governing Board Member, for her interdisciplinary interests in and communication of modern philosophy and science: particularly in relation to physics, and the thinking of Newton, Kant and Pauli. Professor Ma...
  • 2017 PSA Election Results

    On behalf of the Governing Board of the Philosophy of Science Association, it is my pleasure to announce the results of the 2017 PSA Election. Thanks to all those who voted. We had an excellent turnout of 54.9%. Alisa Bokulich of Boston University and Hasok Chang of the University of Cambridge were elected to the Governing Board of the PSA. Each wi...
  • View Recording of PSA/UCS Joint Webinar: Scientific Facts vs. Alternative Facts (sic)

    Wednesday, June 7, 2017 2:00 PM EDT - 3:00 PM EDT Hosted by the Union of Concerned Scientists Center for Science and Democracy View recording of the webinar here: https://ucsusa.adobeconnect.com/pae09j6wqa0k/ How can we understand and respond to “alternative facts” when they are presented as of equal value as scientific facts? The UCS Center for Sc...
  • PSA Stands Up for Science

    The PSA is an official partner of the March for Science, and many of our members participated in marches all over the world, among them our President, Sandy Mitchell, and Past-President, Ken Waters.
  • Letter from Sandra D. Mitchell, PSA President

    Dear PSA Members, I am honored to be serving as the President of PSA (as of January 1, 2017) and want to take a moment to both look forward to new initiatives and opportunities and reflect back on what the organization has been doing. Most importantly, I want to invite you to participate in the activities of the PSA and in collectively considering...
  • Letter from C. Kenneth Waters, PSA Past-President

    Dear PSA Members, I am writing as Past President to report on what PSA has accomplished over the last two years. Let me begin by congratulating our new President, Sandy Mitchell, new Vice President/President-elect, Alison Wylie, and incoming Governing Board members Megan Delehanty and Edouard Machery. There have been two fronts of change for the PS...

The John J. Reilly Center for Science, Technology, and Values, along with the Graduate Program in History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Notre Dame and the Advisory Committee of the James T. Cushing Memorial Prize in History and Philosophy of Physics are pleased to announce the award of the Cushing Prize for 2013 to Dr. Cyrus Mody, Rice University.

Dr. Mody is being honored for his book, Instrumental Community: Probe Microscopy and the Path to Nanotechnology, published by The MIT Press in 2011. The Cushing Prize carries a $1000 award plus an invitation to deliver a lecture as part of the History and Philosophy of Science Colloquium at the University of Notre Dame.

Dr. Mody was nominated for the Cushing Prize by W. Patrick McCray, professor in the Department of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Prof. McCray describes the significance and virtues of Mody's book: "Mody's book provides an excellent study of the emergence of a modern technoscientific community. The focal point of Mody's fine-grained study is the invention and subsequent influence of the scanning tunneling microscope which was the basis for the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physics. Mody shows how this instrument originated in basic physics research at IBM and subsequently became a catalyst for a wide range of nanoscale scientific and engineering research. Along the way, a whole new "instrumental community" emerged such that the STM and its progeny are among the most common tools used by experimental physicists today. Mody's excellent book offers insight into how technical communities function and the instruments that enable frontier research in the physical sciences are made and adopted. Seen more broadly, Instrumental Community also speaks to the commercialization of academic research and how basic research in the physical sciences continues to be a spur for innovation. The book is wellcrafted, subtly written, and thoroughly researched."

Dr. Mody is assistant professor in the Department of History at Rice University, where he teaches the history of science, technology, and engineering. He earned his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 2004.